Birth rate in England and Wales hits 80-YEAR low. Dentists facing massive unemployment.

Global warming to blame.

Birth rates have hit a historic low amid falling fertility rates, an ageing population and increasing numbers of women leaving it until later in life to have children.

There were just over 11 babies born for every 1,000 people in England and Wales last year – the lowest level since birth rates were first recorded 80 years ago.  In total 657,076 children were born – down 3.2 per cent on a year earlier and nearly ten per cent on 2012.

The Office for National Statistics said falling fertility rates were mainly responsible for the fall, but said difficulties conceiving among couples who choose to delay having families was also a major factor.

TThe news of record low birth rates comes in a week in which Prince Harry announced he and Meghan plan to have no more than two children in order to ease over-population and ‘leave something better behind for the next generation’he news of record low birth rates comes in a week in which Prince Harry announced he and Meghan plan to have no more than two children in order to ease over-population and ‘leave something better behind for the next generation’

 

It said ‘women are progressively delaying childbearing to older ages’ and are now most likely to have children in their 30s.  This is because women are more likely to go to university and delay marriage while they pursue their careers.  The breakdown of birth rates in 2018 showed that the greatest decline was among married women.

According to one social scientist that was interviewed, this trend marks not only an aging population, but one that is not even replacing itself.  “The only demographic that is growing in numbers is among the Muslim population.  But then anyone with four wives can have a lot of children.