Feb 13

Frosty Down! Frosty Down!

Another casualty of the South’s weird weather.

Frosty Down

 

Feb 13

Colorado Health-Exchange Director Indicted for Fraud, Theft

Otherwise, the whole thing got off to such a good start.

I guess these things just tend to attract the cream of the crap.

National Review Online reports that the director of Colorado’s health exchange has been placed on administrative leave after the state discovered she had been indicted for stealing from a non-profit.  Citing a story in the Denver Post:

[Christa Ann] McClure, 51, pleaded not guilty Feb. 6 in federal District Court in Montana to eight counts of theft and fraud from a nonprofit housing agency in Billings.

She was indicted Jan. 16 and notified her current Denver employer, the state-sponsored health exchange, on Monday, a few days after the story broke in Montana media, Connect for Health spokesman Ben Davis said in a telephone interview.

Connect for Health performed a criminal background check and checked references before hiring McClure in March, Davis said.

“She was completely clean,” he said. Her position as executive director of Housing Montana of Billings, he said, made her well-qualified for her post as Connect for Health’s director of partner engagement — she was liaison with state and federal partners, such as Medicaid officials. The job pays $130,000 a year.

… McClure, who has not been convicted of any charges, should have informed Connect for Health much earlier of the accusations she was facing, Davis said.

McClure was released pending trial, now scheduled for June. Each of the counts in the indictment against her carry potential penalties of five, 10 or 20 years in prison and a fine of $250,000.

The 12-page indictment alleges that, while serving as executive director of the federally funded Housing Montana, McClure, between 2008 and 2010, paid herself “significant sums” for consulting services, although she was already on the payroll as a full-time employee.

She also made payments to her family and used federal money for personal travel, to pay family bills and to buy consulting services, the indictment alleges.

She also is accused of charging homeowners for a $750 warranty that did not exist, converting a laptop for personal use, inflating the hours she was to be compensated and writing herself a $21,000 check to which she was not entitled.

The indictment did not specify the total amount she allegedly embezzled.

Feb 13

Judge reduces abortion clinic fine to $77.

Because he cares about women.

A Chicago judge has issued a controversial decision to reduce a fine handed down by state health department officials to an Illinois abortion clinic for violations of cleanliness and health codes. The judge reduced the massive $36,000 fine to a mere $77.

Cook County Circuit Judge Alexander White arbitrarily reduced the fine after the Illinois Department of Health (IDPH) conducted a health inspection of the state’s abortion providers in 2011. The issuance of the fine was immediately disputed and has been coursing through the courts ever since.

The IDPH cited the clinic for such violations as storing food items in the same freezer that contained containers of fetal tissue, filthy floors, medication dispensing cups filled with crumbs of medication, recovery rooms with rusted walls, and other filthy conditions. The IDPH report also noted that one employee was re-using discarded paper towels on patients.

Worse, the IDPH charged the clinic for failing to perform CPR on a patient who soon died in its care.

Judge White based his reduction of the fine on the claim that the owner of the clinic closed the facilities down and had only $77 left in the company bank account.

However, the claim that the clinic was shuttered is suspect.

Read the rest of the story here.

Feb 12

TSA seizes (Toy Story) Woody’s Gun.

Woody allegedly told TSA Agent, “You’re my favorite deputy.”

Wonder if they read him rights before they pulled his string.

Another gun-wielding toy has had its weapon seized by airport security. After a cowboy sock monkey Rooster Monkburn had his tiny harmless weapon seized last year, a Woody doll underwent similar probe at London’s Heathrow Airport.

Healthrow traveler John Hazen posted a picture of his son’s figurine to the social-media website Reddit on Tuesday showing a security official removing the doll’s gun. “At Heathrow, security just confiscated his ‘weapon,’ keep the world safe boys,”​ Hazen wrote on the site. The doll does not usually come armed with gun — it was an accessory the family added.

Read the rest of the article here.

Feb 12

Michelle Obama’s new dress.

She’s like Marie Antoinette.  Without the empathy.

The dress first lady Michelle Obama wore at last night’s state dinner was the topic of discussion last night on CNN.

http://l1.yimg.com/bt/api/res/1.2/.mhLEtE7Ffrju8GJpHZTwQ--/YXBwaWQ9eW5ld3M7Zmk9ZmlsbDtoPTg4NztweW9mZj0wO3E9NzU7dz05NjA-/http://media.zenfs.com/en_us/News/ap_webfeeds/505b4ab70ec493064b0f6a706700a133.jpg

One guest thought the cost of the dress was close to $10,000.

“Well, first of all, I love the dress on her because I think it’s so elegant and so simple. I mean, that shape is what we call the princess shape. It’s got that sort of poof at the bottom that’s very sort of billowy at the same time. It’s strapless. I think we want to call that French blue, maybe,” said a guest.

“Some people might call it periwinkle and it’s got this sort of jet bodice and everything, and I think it’s realy pretty. But a dress like that from Mrs. Herrera could potentially run up to almost $10,000.”

Another guest on CNN last night thought the cost was about $12,000. “Well, by the way, I think that dress probably cost around $12,000. But that’s just my guess,” said Sally Quinn.

“FLOTUS was wearing a black and liberty blue Carolina Herrera gown,” the pool reporter said.

The dress didn’t make her butt look big.  But those four jelly donuts she had for breakfast sure did.

Feb 12

God’s way of saying, “I think you should move.”

Sheesh!  Talk about not taking the hint.

Feb 11

Bet I can make your hands sweat in 1.5 minutes.

Feb 03

Obama’s Life Story in Selfies.

No surprises.  The media only shows us what they want us to see.  As I said, no surprises.  I guess it’s incumbent on us to ask what is missing from this story.  Whatever the story might be.

You may recall the hubbub surrounding Obama with his way too friendly picture taking deal with Denmark’s head of state.  She just happens to be a blonde, leggy dame, I mean Dane – and, no I’m not talking about Ann Coulter.

If a picture speaks a thousand words, these gems fill a library.

Obama1Obama3Obama2Obama4Obama5Obama6Obama7H/T to D.Akridge

 

Feb 01

Finally. An appropriate use for a Harley Davidson.

Personally, I think Harley guys are a little off kilter to begin with.  I mean, really.  Overpriced.  Underpowered. Noisy. Vibrating.  And those are just the good points.  So I guess I shouldn’t be surprised.  But this is strange at so many different levels.  But here’s the headline:

Ohio man buried riding his 1967 Harley-Davidson motorcycle in extra-large grave.

Standley is seen propped up on the back of his 1967 Electra Glide cruiser while surrounded by some of his trophies.The Ohio motorhead was spectacularly laid to rest in a Mechanicsburg cemetery on Friday while seated on the back of his 1967 Electra Glide cruiser thanks to the handiwork of five embalmers and a metal brace.

May God have mercy on his soul and spare him from the torment of riding a Harley for all eternity.

 

Jan 29

Peyton Manning sets record . . .

Straight.

Peyton Manning Peyton Manning, the quarterback of the playoff-bound Denver Broncos, completed the greatest statistical regular season at the quarterback position in the 94-year history of the National Football League (NFL). This regular season saw Manning set records in yards passed in a season (5,477) and touchdowns thrown in a season (55), and he led his team to accumulate more points (606) in a regular season than had ever been done before. Manning also tied the record for touchdowns thrown in a game (7) in the Broncos Week 1 win over the defending Super Bowl Champions, the Baltimore Ravens.

Any fan of Peyton Manning or the NFL generally knows that Manning is the consummate professional. He treats the fans, media personnel, teammates, and opponents with respect. He works as hard—and probably harder—at his craft than any other player in the league. And he produces one fun, family-friendly commercial after another, showing his sense of humor and a humble assessment of his own importance. But what many fans of Manning and the NFL may not be aware of is Manning’s Christian faith. In the excerpt below from Peyton’s book Manning (available on Amazon in paperback here and Kindle here), which he co-wrote with his father Archie Manning in 2001, the record-setting quarterback gives a rare description of his faith and its importance to him. The description is a rare one, not because Peyton’s faith is an insignificant part of his life, but because, as Peyton explains in the excerpt, he has intentionally chosen to speak more by his actions than by his words.

Here is the excerpt:

Like my dad, I make it a point when I speak to groups to talk about priorities, and when it’s schoolkids, I rank those priorities as: faith, family, and education, then football. For me generally it had always been the big four: faith, family, friends, and football. And I tell all of them that as important as football is to me, it can never be higher than fourth. My faith has been number one since I was thirteen years old and heard from the pulpit on a Sunday morning in New Orleans a simple question: “If you died today, are you one hundred percent sure you’d go to heaven?” Cooper was there and Eli [Peyton’s two brothers] but it didn’t hit them at the time the way it did me. It was a big church, and I felt very small, but my heart was pounding. The minister invited those who would like that assurance through Jesus Christ to raise their hands, and I did. Then he invited us to come forward, to take a stand, and my heart really started pounding. And from where we sat, it looked like a mile to the front.

But I got up and did it. And I committed my life to Christ, and that faith has been most important to me ever since. Some players get more vocal about it—the Reggie Whites, for example—and some point to Heaven after scoring a touchdown and praise God after games. I have no problem with that. But I don’t do it, and don’t think it makes me any less a Christian. I just want my actions to speak louder, and I don’t want to be more of a target for criticism than I already am. Somebody sees you drinking a beer, which I do, and they think, “Hmmmm, Peyton says he’s this, that, or the other, and there he is drinking alcohol. What’s that all about?”

Christians drink beer. So do non-Christians. Christians also make mistakes, just as non-Christians do. My faith doesn’t make me perfect, it makes me forgiven, and provides me the assurance I looked for half my life ago. I think God answered our prayers with Cooper, and that was a test of our faith. But I also think I’ve been blessed—having so little go wrong in my life, and being given so much. I pray every night, sometimes long prayers about a lot of things and a lot of people, but I don’t talk about it or brag about it because that’s between God and me, and I’m no better than anybody else in God’s sight.

But I consider myself fortunate to be able to go to Him for guidance, and I hope (and pray) I don’t do too many things that displease Him before I get to Heaven myself. I believe, too, that life is much better and freer when you’re committed to God in that way. I find being with others whose faith is the same has made me stronger. J.C. Watts and Steve Largent, for example. They’re both in Congress now. We had voluntary pregame chapel at Tennessee, and I attend chapel every Sunday with players on the team in Indianapolis. I have spoken to church youth groups, and at Christian high schools. And then simply as a Christian, and not as good a one as I’d like to be.

How do I justify football in the context of “love your enemy?” I say to kids, well, football is most definitely a “collision sport,” and I can’t deny it jars your teeth and at the extreme can break your bones. But I’ve never seen it as a “violent game,” there are rules to prevent that, and I know I don’t have to hate anybody on the other side to play as hard as I can within the rules. I think you’d have to get inside my head to appreciate it, but I do love football. And, yes, I’d play it for nothing if that was the only way, even now when I’m no longer a child. I find no contradiction in football and my faith.

Ah, but do I “pray for victory?” No, except as a generic thing. I pray to keep both teams injury free, and personally, that I use whatever talent I have to the best of my ability. But I don’t think God really cares about who wins football games, except as winning might influence the character of some person or group. Besides. If the Colts were playing the Cowboys and I prayed for the Colts and Troy Aikman prayed for the Cowboys, wouldn’t that make it a standoff?

I do feel this way about it. Dad says it can take twenty years to make a reputation, and five minutes to ruin it. I want my reputation to be able to make it through whatever five-minute crises I run into. And I’m a lot more comfortable knowing where my help is.

H/T to D. Bachert

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